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Monthly ArchiveMarch 2010



Studio projects Monday March 29 2010 07:27 am

Wood type exploration

A Philadelphia graphic design professor wants to do some personal design research via letterpress using wood type. She spent the day with Lead Graffiti working on our Vandercook Universal III and some of our 50 line (8.25″) wood type numbers.

wood type numbers

Wouldn’t this idea be an interesting way to do room numbers in a design school. Or better yet in a business school. If you did the street signs in a small town it would have to change what someone felt about the town as they were driving through. Hmmm.

We are looking forward to this being day one of a lot of nice design days.

Here is a shot of the prints hanging while printing the second color. A really nice way to spend an afternoon.

wood type numbers

events Wednesday March 24 2010 06:52 am

Mid-Atlantic Regional Archives Conference

Jill and Ray are giving a talk to the Mid-Atlantic Regional Archives Conference at the end of April on our work designing, photographing, and cooperating with 50+ authors for Histories of Newark: 1758-2008 that we published under our Wallflowers Press name in 2007. The book was a 288-page, hard cover book with some nice details published in an edition of 1000 numbered copies which sold out in about 6 months.

MAVAC

MARAC was nice enough to use a few photographs of Newark citizens that ran as a band through the entire book on their Spring 2010 booklet cover.

description of the $450 deluxe copies: still have five of the twelve for sale

all of the entries on our blog related to the project

Studio projects Tuesday March 23 2010 10:32 am

Keepsake for The Poetry Bomb tour 2010

Lead Graffiti had the privilege of working with S.A. Griffin and Bottle of Smoke Press to produce a keepsake which will given out during The Poetry Bomb Couch Surfing Across American Tour of Words 2010. The keepsake, designed and printed in an edition of 400 by Lead Graffiti, is a poem by Ellyn Maybe, written especially for The Poetry Bomb.

Be sure to join in when it is in a city near you.

Ellyn Maybe Poetry Bomb

A link with details about The Poetry Bomb: The Poetry Bomb on Facebook

Studio projects Sunday March 14 2010 07:43 pm

Wieden + Kennedy / New York

It was nice to see Lead Graffiti’s name appear on the blog at Wieden + Kennedy / New York related to some letterpress support we added to Grand Army’s work in the Manifest Equality exhibition in Los Angeles.

This was their piece which was letterpress printed over old magazine pages and pieced into a collage.

grand army© Grand Army / 2010

And Grand Army’s video of the exhibition opening.

Grand Army photos at Lead Graffiti (click next to move through them) where you can also see images of the wood type layouts.

workshops Tuesday March 09 2010 09:42 am

‘Workshops’ category in ‘Portfolio’

We’ve been doing a number of Lead Graffiti Creative Letterpress workshops for professional designers and students which have a creative result.

We try to do each of them at least a bit differently from each other. Some have results nice enough to be put into the spotlight.

A link to the workshop portfolio main page.

This is the link to the page describing our Creative Workshop.

Studio projects Saturday March 06 2010 08:34 am

Delaware College of Art & Design workshop

We provided an interesting, longer-than-expected Creative Letterpress workshop to 14 students from the Delaware College of Art & Design and their professor John Breakey. We do a workshop with DCAD graphic design students each year and wanted to do something different, yet informative.

We took a long quote from Eric Gill’s An Essay on Typography, divided it into segments for each student which they handset in a different metal typeface from our collection, and then snaked them together into the 15″ x 22″ broadside you see below.

DCAD workshop eric gill

This gave the students the chance to see some different typefaces from what they see on their Macintosh computers along with seeing the value in a group project where everyone contributes a part, making the sum total a quite impressive broadside for them to keep as both a historical as well as a creative reference. We also got to see some of our collection printed for the first time. Here is the list of typefaces from top to bottom.

          Gill Sans
          Augustea Inline
          Champleve
          Boulevard
          Agency Gothic
          Packard
          American Uncial
          Othello
          Cochin Open
          Profile
          Anthanaeum
          Stymie Black Condensed
          Eve Bold
          Bauer Bodoni Heavy Italic
          Spartan Heavy
          Legenda
          Delphin
          Castellar
          Garamond & Garamond Italic

We produced the opening word of the quote the day before with wood type in Gill Sans to celebrate the author using our handrolling technique we refer to as TypeArt. As an added experience for the students, we cast the broadside’s credits on our Intertype C4 with each student personally doing their own name in Palatino and the typeface they handset in Palatino Italic. Seeing the Intertype in action is always a showstopper.

Here is the quote we used.

TYPOGRAPHY (the reproduction of lettering by means of movable letter types) was originally done by pressing the inked surface or ‘face’ of a letter made of wood or metal against a surface of paper or vellum. The unevenness and hardness of paper, the irregularities of type (both in respect of their printing faces and the dimensions of their ‘bodies’) and the mechanical imperfections of presses and printing methods made the work of early printers notable for corresponding unevennesses, irregularities & mechanical imperfections. To ensure that every letter left its mark more or less completely & evenly, considerable and noticeable impression was made in the paper. The printed letter was a coloured letter at the bottom of a ditch.

–Eric Gill from An Essay on Typography, 1931